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Post Info TOPIC: Patrick Family Sept


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RE: Patrick Family Sept
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Let us not forget in the words of Hector McKechnie, author of the (Clan Lamont , pub.1935), "......the McPhadricks and Patricks were one and the same."



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Philip Chearnley O'Sullivan, Lieut-Col., USA (ret)



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Dennis,

i Am new to this forum.

My family is from Magoffin County Ky.

My common Ancestor in Eastern, Ky is Jeremiah Patrick.

Jeremiah Patrick had a brother James Patrick.

James was a 'professional' soldier.

Hope to learn more on how to use this forum.

Good to meet you.

Your crest is the same we claim.

But I did not have the colors.

Just a black and white copy.

I am glad to see how it looks in color.

Please respond if possible.

Mark



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Ah laddie one must remember thy lineage.  The Patricks and McPhadricks were one and the same and held Lamont lands in the area of Coustoune and Butte.  Allegiance was owed and readily give to the Clan Chief.  The McPhadricks were one of the oldest septs of the Clan Lamont and were always held in high esteem by the Clan Chief due their loyalty and fealty.  See: "The Lamont clan 1235-1935; seven centuries of clan history from record evidence.", by Hector McKechnie. 

 

 

This Post has been misplace!



-- Edited by liam26 on Tuesday 6th of January 2015 09:02:36 PM



-- Edited by liam26 on Tuesday 6th of January 2015 09:05:42 PM

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Philip Chearnley O'Sullivan, Lieut-Col., USA (ret)



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Ah laddie one must remember thy lineage.  The Patricks and McPhadricks were one and the same and held Lamont lands in the area of Coustoune and Butte.  Allegiance was owed and readily give to the Clan Chief.  The McPhadricks were one of the oldest septs of the Clan Lamont and were always held in high esteem by the Clan Chief due their loyalty and fealty.  See: "The Lamont clan 1235-1935; seven centuries of clan history from record evidence.", by Hector McKechnie. 

 

This Post has been misplace!



-- Edited by liam26 on Tuesday 6th of January 2015 09:06:13 PM

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Philip Chearnley O'Sullivan, Lieut-Col., USA (ret)



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Ah laddie one must remember thy lineage. The Patricks and McPhadricks were one and the same and held Lamont lands in the area of Coustoune and Butte. Allegiance was owed and readily give to the Clan Chief. The McPhadricks were one of the oldest septs of the Clan Lamont and were always held in high esteem by the Clan Chief due their loyalty and fealty. See: "The Lamont clan 1235-1935; seven centuries of clan history from record evidence.", by Hector McKechnie.

 

 

This Post has been misplace!



-- Edited by liam26 on Tuesday 6th of January 2015 09:06:52 PM

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Philip Chearnley O'Sullivan, Lieut-Col., USA (ret)



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For anybody who is interested in building out their family lines on the Wikitree and making any contributions that you have, you can find the profile for Hugh H. Patrick, who was married to Mary Campbell at www.wikitree.com/wiki/Patrick-201. I think that we should make some effort to fill this out as much as possible, as so many of us have found our connection through Hugh's children and grandchildren.

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Dave Patrick



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MacPatrick wrote:
This is the information on my Patrick line.

THE PATRICK FAMILY OF SCOTLAND, VIRGINIA AND KENTUCKY

 

 

Our Patrick ancestors have been represented in the history of Scotland, Virginia and Kentucky since around 1400.  They have been well documented by several reasearchers, the most notable being the late Dr. Lee Wellington Patrick of Fairway, Kansas.  Dr. Patrick’s records are the result of his study and research of the Scottish archives and are documented in his book Patrick in Retrospect published in 1993. 

The Patricks are most certainly descendants of The MacPhadrick Lamonts of Couston, this family is a cadet family of Clan Lamont, their history is documented in Hector McKechnie’s Book The Lamont Clan 1235-1935. The MacPhadrick lands of about 280 imperial acres are found near the present day town of Couston located on Loch Striven in Cowal adjacent to those of the Lamonts.  Clan Lamont is well documented in charters executed with their neighbors the Campbells.  The Campbells were noted for their efficient recordkeeping.  A vast amount of Clan Lamont history is preserved in the records of Clan Campbell. 

There are several variations of the name Patrick, surnames were not fixed or passed from generation to generation as we know them today.  A passage in McKechnie’s book points this out.  “The first entry in the surviving register of Baptisms (beginning in 1735) is of a son Archibald to Hugh Patrick in Couston, who later appears as Hugh McPhatrick.  Other variations are Mcffathrick and Gilpatrick.  That same Archibald married in 1736 under the name McGilpharich, and a Hugh Lamont was ferrier at Couston in 1753.”[1]

How little fixed were the clan surnames is brought out by the following letter to an inquirer from the Session Clerk of Inverchaolain in 1830.  “As to the sirname [sic] Lamont & Patrick or McPhatrick which is all the same,” it narrates, “ As of the sirname [sic] they go by the two names in common in our parish to this day, and your father’s extract is a plain proof of this fact, the introductory margin of the register bearing the name Lamont while the body bears the name Mcfadrick.”[2]

 The early Patricks in Scotland were Catholics. The Patricks became early converts to the Protestant religion and joined the reformers under the Earl of Glencairn, some of them accompanied the expedition to the north of Ireland under Hugh Montmorency of Broadstone, afterwards Viscount of Ardes, who as expressed in his patent from James VI brought a colony of Scots into Clandebara and Ardes, toward the increase of that religion settled in that county where their descendants still possess property near Berry.[3]

Our direct Patrick Lineage is as follows:

John Patrick (or Patric):   b. 1429 in Ayrshire, Scotland, early records show he was a Notary, a person who could read and write.  I have been told by a native of Scotland that a Notary was a papal office of the Catholic Church.

John Patrick:  b. 1460 in Ayrshire Scotland

William Patrick:  b. 1495 in Ayrshire, Scotland, d. 1549 in Edinburgh, Scotland

            Sons:   Hew (Hugh), Robert, James, John b. 1530 d. 1638 in Edinburgh, Scotland and Alexander

John Patrick, b. 1530 d. 1638 son of William Patrick, who obtained a grant of the lands of Overmain, near Kilwinning, from the monastery, aquired by charter in 1605, the estate of Byres in Ayrshire and subsequently part of the lands of Dalgarven. He died in 1638 leaving five sons James, Robert, Hew, John and Alexander.[4]

James Patrick:  b. 1552 in Edinburgh. Scotland, he married Agnes Finley b. 1557,

Sons: Thomas, Hugh, John, James, Robert and William

Thomas Kilpatrick:  b. 1580

John Kilpatrick:  b. 1605, he married Agnes Dockson in 1628, she was b. 1612 d. abt 1669

            Sons:   James and Robert

Robert Patrick:  b. 1635 in Edinburgh, Scotland, he married Susannah Harris

            Son:     Hugh H.

Hugh H. Patrick:   b. 1678 in Edinburgh, Scotland, he married Mary Campbell on November 24, 1704; she was the daughter of Sheriff Walter Campbell,[5] son of Archibald Campbell.  Some genealogies show Mary to be the daughter of Sheriff Walter Campbell of Skipness, the Clan Campbell Society of North American has verified that our Mary was not his daughter.

            Sons:   Robert, Hugh, William and John

Robert Patrick:  b. 1705 in Edinburgh, Scotland, he immigrated to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on August 25, 1725 along with brothers Hugh, William and John.  He married Elizabeth in 1728 at Cumberland, Pennsylvania.  He died in 1758 in Frederick County, Maryland.

Children:        James b. 1729, Hugh b. 1732 d. 1814, William b. 1734 d. 1818, John b. 1736, Elizabeth b. 1737, Jeremiah b. 1738

 

I come down for the William line From Robert so add another distant cousin to the list!



[1] The Clan Lamont 1235-1935 by Hector McKechnie,  pgs. 454 and 455

[2] The Clan Lamont 1235-1935 by Hector McKechnie,  pg. 455

[3] Burke’s encyclopedia of Heraldry and Burke’s Landed Gentry from “The Origin of the Patrick Name” by Sharroll Kay Minnix

[4] Burke’s encyclopedia of Heraldry and Burke’s Landed Gentry from “The Origin of the Patrick Name” by Sharroll Kay Minnix

[5] James C. Patrick, Summary of Patrick Lineage



-- Edited by MacPatrick at 15:11, 2008-12-01

-- Edited by MacPatrick at 15:16, 2008-12-01


 



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I've started working back on my end of the family line. When I get to your line I'll be sure to link it.



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I know this is 'WAY tardy, but the Ora et Labore phrase is Latin and means Pray and Work, a motto that is still in use in some schools and on at least one farm owned by a family of Nederlanders of the Reformed faith who live near us.  You can get a bit more historical info on the phrase on Wiki.  smile



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Ora et Labora - According to Google, it means Pray and Work.  It's also the motto of the Benedictine Monks.



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Dave Patrick



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Sadly, there is not actual connection.  It has to do with Google.  Somebody searched John Patrick Ayrshire Scotland 1429.  Google made a match with the terms John Scotland 1429, with John Stewart, who was married to Ms. Mongomerie, and then they posted it on their Ancestry family tree, and suddenly everybody was adding it.



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Dave Patrick



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folks like that are very frustrating, you see someone with a Lammon prior to 1794 and has their fathers name but they dont have any linked data or document with them.

I had one a couple of weeks ago and sent them a message about where they found the data and their replay was "I dont know"


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Steve Allen
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