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Post Info TOPIC: The Thistle and the Brier


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The Thistle and the Brier
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This is a title of a book that is of particular interest to me because we Patrick's of eastern Kentucky have often been called "brier hoppers."  Another reason is that my own father often used certain words that no one else in central Kentucky used, to my knowledge.  I decided they must be Irish but was delight to find some were Scottish in origin.  Also, my eldest brother said that our Paternal aunt always referred to him and my eldest sister as "lads and lassies."  Below is a short description of the book:

"This book explores connections and similarities between Scotland and Appalachia from ancient times to the present, concentrating upon cultural revival movements centered around vernacular language, literature and the folk arts. The primary purpose of this book is to show how  Scots and Appalachians in the twentieth century have made creative use of vernacular language, literature and folklore to express and define themselves in their own terms. Hopefully this book will stimulate further discussions of cultural revivals and identity politics on both sides of the Atlantic."

Probably someone here is is familiar with the book.

I don't own a copy of the book but I hope to soon. I don't have the author's name handy but I will edit the post to include it!

It is called The Thistle and the Brier: Historical Links and Cultural Parallels between Scotland and Appalachia, by Richard Blaustein.

Cheers,

Marilyn

 



-- Edited by Madame Farquar on Monday 17th of November 2014 05:41:28 PM

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Marilyn Patrick Sorrell



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As an aside: My wife spent a month in Ireland a couple of years ago and met with some Patrick's in Southern Ireland as she was checking her Patrick connections. They told her that the Irish Patrick's actually came to Ireland from Scotland.



-- Edited by EoinDubh on Wednesday 19th of November 2014 02:08:58 PM

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That is spot on, from what I have learned. The Scots traveled to Ireland and finding it not much better than home (more of the same) a lot of them migrated on to England, then eventually to the US. Of interest is the fact that on the ship's lists they were ALL listed as Irish, because they departed from there. Also, In Stone Fences of the Bluegrass, that author noted that while the stone fences were attributed to the Irish, she actually traces them to Scotland! Another amazing book. I love stone fences too!

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Marilyn Patrick Sorrell

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